Tag Archive: boneyard beach



I’ve been busy over the last three days, but the photos have been taken and it’s finally time to post.

I have so many photos to choose from for February 22nd. My childhood friend, Connie visited for a day on her way to be with her daughter and family. I cherish these visits, as we have a lot of history … good history!. We may be separated for a year (or more) at a time, but when we get together, it’s like we never were apart. Conversation flows … and, that’s an understatement! 🙂 Plus – she travels with her white lab, Maggie. I’ve never been much of a dog person, but Maggie has won over my heart, not to mention that the cats did very well with her. There were a few “fluffed up” kitty moments with minimal hissing, but it was short lived, as Maggie doesn’t chase them. They always have time to quickly retreat to the safety of “high places” in the house.

Connie has a blog, too: View from the Empty Nest. It’s full of insights — the kind that come while walking Maggie! Many are thoughts I’ve always had, but I never “thought” to “think” them! (I know — that doesn’t quite make sense…!) Check it out — it’s a good read!

On the one full day Connie was with us, we looked for “photo ops” in beautiful spots, both at home and in the neighborhood. First there were some photo ops right on our lagoon. Then we went into Whooping Crane Conservancy. After a quick lunch, we took Maggie for a walk on Boneyard beach. As we drove there, we made a stop along the side of the road where there’s another lagoon and aquatic life often hang out. As I type, I still can’t decide which photo will be chosen for this. All I know is that I will include several bonus photos!

Ok – – here we go — an alligator in the swamp inside Whooping Crane Conservancy:

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365 photo #53

And — of course there will be some bonus photos:

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1. fall foliage lives on inside the Whooping Crane Conservancy…!
2. Ibis well hidden in the brush in Whooping Crane Conservancy

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1. Ibis on the lagoon at home
2. I wonder what those cormorants see??

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1. Anhinga – drying it’s wings
2. Maggie — such a sweet white lab — on the beach! 🙂

Connie left first thing the next morning – but I kind of remained sluggish, and didn’t get out for photos. Suddenly it was 10 p.m. and I hadn’t even picked up my camera – so yesterday’s photo is a wall hanging — something my son gave to me for Christmas one year. I love the haggard expression the kitty. Reminds me of me when I’m not in a good mood! 😉 When I was younger I had a photo copy of this picture taped to my refrigerator, which said “I have a handgun and PMS, any questions”. Kind of said it all!

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365 photo #54

Today I looked to our cats for the photo. The weather started out ok, but it’s now reduced to rumbling thunderstorms and tornado watches…. This is Felix — “birding and squirreling” behind the draperies!:

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365 photo #55

Bonus photo: On Tuesday night I won honorable mention in the camera club competition – category “windows”. It’s the first ever ribbon for me:

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This isn’t the EXACT photo I submitted as it had to be resized just slightly for printing, and I enhanced the saturation a small amount, as well.
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For yesterday’s photo of the day, I had a variety to choose from, as, after church, Ray and I took a walk on our “Boneyard Beach”. It was a crystal clear day – though a little cool. I couldn’t figure out what to wear to be comfortable. In retrospect, my new fleece vest would have been perfect, as my fleece jacket was too much.

I traveled with only my 100-400 lens on my camera – determined to find and photograph some wildlife, and there was … some. Yesterday’s photo of the day is the elusive sand piper! They are so quick, and skittish around humans, making them difficult (for me) to photograph. There were groups of them in the water – and groups of them flying in chorus, but here is one that posed for me for a “milli” second – long enough to get this shot! *g*

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365 photo #29

And — because I photographed so much more – here are a few bonus photos: (see larger by clicking them)

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1. Great Blue Heron – on an oyster bed … fishing
2. These shells are everywhere on the beach

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1. Mitchellville entrance to the beach — that’s Ray in the red
2. sea gulls – galore!

Today’s photo of the day is – again – the wiry squirrel, taken right out of our back sliding glass door. We have so many squirrels, that I suspect there will be many who will make the 365 photo project. This little guy stayed in this position on the tree for quite some time — long enough for me to run to the bedroom – grab my SD card (which was in my computer), put it in my camera, change the lens to the 100-400 mm and go back to snap this photo, and several more! Ray wondered if he was “sunning” himself – kind of like we humans like to sunbathe on the beach!

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365 photo #30

After church and our usual lunch at the Plantation Cafe today, Ray and I decided to walk off our big meal at one of the beaches which we can access from where we live. The weather was warm and sunny — “better” than perfect for a January day. One MUST take advantage of days like these!

I don’t know the actual name of the beach, but it’s on Port Royal Sound. It’s not the typical ocean beach with traditional ocean waves, and pristine sand. This beach is often littered with beach grass, a little pluff mud, oyster beds, driftwood and many assorted shells. This, for me, makes it more interesting than the average ocean beach. I have a photography friend who has the knack for finding bones, teeth and other artifacts on this beach. However, I don’t have an eye for those things, so when I’m alone, they’re lost on me. She and I have dubbed this beach “Boneyard Beach” because of her interesting finds!

Like the ocean, The tides affect this beach too, and there is always a line of grass showing the last high tide mark. There are also gentle waves, bringing the shells gently in and out. Often I see aquatic wildlife there — egrets, herons — hanging out in the tall grass grazing for food in the tide pools. But – there was nothing today except for a few sea gulls. So – I took pictures of the scenery

Today’s photo is of one shell that’s hung from a piece of driftwood. I’ve noticed on several beaches in the area that it’s become custom for beach walkers to sometimes hang shells from dead branches making the driftwood look like a very “beachy” Christmas tree! Sometimes red ribbon or other beach things like colorful seaweed is placed there which really adds a festive touch. Today I saw only this lone shell and thought it needed to have a photo taken of it….

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365 photo # 8

As I said in my last entry, on the day of the earthquake and tsunami, a friend and I went to a beach on Port Royal Sound, which is not far from my house.  Because it’s not directly on the ocean, it’s a bit more sheltered and the water more “quiet”.  The waves are more gentle, though the tides still affect the water.  On this beach there’s lots of “pluff mud” in addition to sand and beds of oyster shells and numerous weathered and unique pieces of driftwood.  To me, this beach is more interesting because of the numerous things to inspect and photograph. 

My friend has dubbed this beach “Boneyard Beach” because of the artifacts she has found there on her many beach combing trips, and I’ve taken to calling this beach this name, too.  She’s come home with teeth and bones from various animals and aquatic wildlife who had once lived there.  I don’t have an eye for finding these, but she seems to spot them in among the shell beds and sand like they are a shiny needle in a haystack!   

On this day, I can’t remember if we found any artifacts.  I arrived at the beach reeling from the news of the earthquake – and lack of sleep from having watched too much of the news about it in the middle of the night just after it happened.  I almost didn’t want to go, but am glad I did.  I said this before, but it’s worth saying again:  I saw the water … and it was sobering to realize that this same calm water could cause such death and destruction – if given the right conditions. 

So – my friend and I went about our usual walking the beach with our cameras – enjoying the gorgeous, clear weather, the calm water, the beach, the driftwood, and shells – and, at least for me – appreciating it more than usual.

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1.  View of the beach showing pluff mud, beach grass, shells and sand – and on the edge of a little stream of water that flows from inland to the beach. 

2.  pluff mud at the shore line – the tide was high but receding

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1.  Great egret along the shorline and beach grass

2.  I believe this is a loon in winter plumage.  Loons breed on fresh water northern lakes, but they migrate to the coast – sometimes further south – to sheltered salt water bodies during the winter, and this loon is still in his winter home.  I’m not sure they go until April or even early May.  However, I also believe that it’s injured.  I was astounded at how close he allowed me to get to him.  As I got closer to him, he did move – but kind of limped toward the water.  I do know, however, that loons are very awkward on land.  Except to nest, they spend almost no time on land, so this may be it, too.  He did manage to waddle back to the water after being startled by my friend’s and my presence. 

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1.  An interesting close up of a piece of driftwood in the sand.  I see a head on this – and an eye, nose and even a mouth, too!

2.  More driftwood – along a stream that runs from inland to the beach whether the tide is in or out. 

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1.  Looking back to the stream of water that goes into the Sound.  If you look carefully, you can see a Great Blue Heron standing on those rocks.  The picture was taken into the sun, so there was a lack of contrast between the bird and the water.  Click on the picture to see it larger in my flickr account.

2.  The entrance / exit to the beach.  I took this as we were leaving.

From there we went over to Jarvis Park … next entry….!

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