Category: Travel


Kezar Lake, July 18-28, 2012


Our time this year at Kezar was nothing like the vacations of my youth where my grandfather called the shots, the routine was exacting, and the life style, rustic. Up until this trip, my husband and I had a busy summer filled with unplanned medical issues, (which have mostly been resolved), as well as trips and events that I wouldn’t exactly call “relaxing”. We were so ready for some rejuvenation time, and 10 days spent “in camp” on Kezar Lake is just the ticket! However, preparations for the trip are a little more involved than going to a “resort” where all your creature comforts are taken care of for you. Although there are blankets in camp, we have to bring up our own bedding. We also need to roughly plan our menus and figure out whatever other necessities we need prior to leaving home. On our way into camp we shop at a major grocery store to purchase these things. The local store nearest camp, The Center Lovell Market, carries a good many things, and I’m impressed with it’s selections. However, it still is a small store, and often an item or two is not carried. This one shopping trip basically holds us for the duration, and we supplement our groceries as needed from the Center Lovell store.

Once we settle into camp, with beds made and groceries put away, it’s time to get serious about the main reason for being there … “chillin'”! And that is just what we did.

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Good Morning, Kezar – as taken from our bedroom upstairs!

Morning coffee was either on the porch or the dock. We lingered – and breakfast often blended into lunch.

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If not on the dock, most of life is lived on the porch!

Dock time! Swimming happened anytime we felt the need for a cool, refreshing break. I had my camera nearby — usually with the 100-400 zoom lens attached — with me to record our time and whatever wildlife we might encounter…

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1. A loon pops up not far from the dock. I think this is what kept me so vigilant with my camera, as one never knew when a loon would appear close by in photography distance. It happened more than once during our stay. They are such beauties! I love their breeding plumage!
2. We have these spiders who live under the dock and either in or under our canoe – not sure. This fear kept me from taking the canoe out at all during our stay, as I didn’t want to get out in the middle of the lake and find one of them crawling around inside the canoe with me! I don’t know what kind of spider they are, but don’t believe they are harmful. However, they *are* are large. I also know they are more scared of us than we are of them because if I leaned nearer them to get the photograph, they often would scamper away.

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1. There seemed to always be a spider on the edge of the canoe!
2. The dragon flies were most beautiful – and there were many of them.

There are things about the view from the dock that I often would zero in on in my photographs:

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I am intrigued with this boathouse that is on one of the islands across the lake. The sunlight catches the roof at mid morning giving off a bright glow on both the roof and the reflection on the lake. But – in the afternoon, one can see it’s pretty green color.

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1. Wouldn’t you like to live in this cabin – sitting on top of this hill looking down over Kezar? Nice boathouse, too!
2. Cloud cover was often the subject for my photographs. I enjoyed how much it changed.

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Water fun: water skiing, sailing and kayaking!

At the end of the day, we either had cocktails on the dock, on the porch, or inside the cabin, then dinner. We ate in camp most of the time, but also had a dinner out at Ebenezer’s Pub twice (for some great microbrewery beer!) and Pleasant Point Inn once. On one occasion we had breakfast, and then another time, lunch at the little restaurant at the Center Lovell Market. It was a nice interlude, and a place to quickly check email on our phones, as they have wifi! There is next to no cell phone service, nor do we have internet or TV reception in camp.

We had one of the most gorgeous sunsets at Pleasant Point Inn…

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Salad presentation is everything!

As I think back on our 10 days in camp, we didn’t “do” all that much. In a way I wish we had done more like take rides in the canoe / kayak, or taken a road trip to Portland, or another place of interest in Maine. Bottom line: we were so incredibly lazy! However, we left feeling much better about life and ourselves. Sometimes it’s good to swear off technology (like TV and internet) and live simply with just a camera in hand, and a good book to read.

Returning to “civilization” is not always easy, although, for this technology junkie, I was glad to return to internet and TV! In addition, it’s interesting how one is so attuned to hearing background noises of civilization – like traffic sounds, horns beeping, ambulances, TV noises, household air conditioning, etc. We blot it out from one’s conscious attention. However these sounds are not present when one is on Kezar, and are replaced by the nature’s sounds: loons, an occasional bull frog, wind in the trees, rain on the roof, the lapping of lake water against the shoreline rocks, and just plain silence. Returning back to “civilization noises” is almost too much stimuli. Until one begins to again blot these sounds out, it can be a bit overwhelming.

I have so many stories of many other years at Kezar, and I’d like to compile them in a few entries here. As I think on them, they will become entries of their own… Later on that.


While the summer is still here, and memories of our vacation time on Kezar Lake, Maine are still (fairly) fresh in my mind, I want to post about it. But – this time I want to go into much more depth about the history of our “camp”, my childhood experiences there before I mention how we spent our time in camp this year.

There is something very special and “lasting” about vacation memories made as a child. They are the kind of recollections that create new “brain wrinkles”, so to speak, which are so strong that they become part of one’s soul. It’s so special, that I’m struggling now to find the right words to describe how it feels! Our time at Kezar Lake may only have been for two weeks a year, but the memories have taken over a lot more space in my heart than the actual time spent there. The views from the dock on Kezar are seared in my memory. I can “see” them always – without a photograph….

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Our camp, consisting of two rustic cabins located on the north end of Kezar Lake, used to belong to my grandfather, then to my parents. Now, camp is owned by my three siblings and I. The South Cabin, with it’s 2 bedrooms upstairs and living area downstairs, including screened in porch, is our main living space. The North Cabin is used mainly as bedrooms – including the living room area downstairs. It also has the same configuration of bedrooms upstairs and porch, but with a third bedroom located off the living area downstairs. When we were kids, we slept on army cots out on the porch “under the stars” and to the sound of the loons. The kitchen was never set up as such, and only has an old wood stove which I suspect was there when my grandfather purchased camp, and hasn’t been used in many years.

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1. South Cabin – where the living happens
2. North Cabin – a place to sleep

When we were children, the chemical toilets in both cabins were “yucky”. One must remember, however that this was CAMP, and “part of the experience”, or so I told myself ~. The waste had to be manually lifted and dumped in a pit which was dug first thing at the beginning of each summer – not a pleasant job. In the mid 1990’s my mom finally installed flush toilet facilities in both cabins, as well as hot running water, which we pump up from the lake. However, that is just for bathing and use in the toilets. For drinking and cooking, we have (and have always had) running spring water in both cabins. We have a personal stake in making sure that Kezar Lake remains a pristine, clear lake, because of how we use lake water! I’m grateful to Mom for making these changes, which weren’t simple to implement, as town codes had to be followed and approval had to be given to ensure the lake water would not be harmed.

With the exception only one summer (right after my youngest sister was born), our family went to “Maine” each summer during my father’s two week vacation. It was a 10 hour trip back then – and our car was crammed full – with the family and often a friend or two and everyone’s luggage, making it double the fun! My grandfather was usually in camp, as well, as it belonged to him at that time. It was he who called the shots as to how our daily life would be “in camp”. He told us when to get up – and when to go to bed, when to eat, when to swim, when to do chores, when to shop for groceries, when to rest. Our time in camp was amazingly structured, almost military style, but not so rigid that it was unbearable. However, I admit that I have no desire to recreate that kind of regimen anymore!

We had an old army bell which still hangs outside of the South Cabin which he’d ring when it was time to get up (about 8 a.m) – and again when it was breakfast time (about 8:30 a.m.). For a few years, my brother, who played the trumpet (and bugle), would play both Revile in the morning and Taps at sunset. My grandfather would raise the flag each morning before we sat down for breakfast, and take it down at sunset. At breakfast my grandfather had morning devotions with numerous Bible readings, and would ask each of us to read them. It was a good 15 or 20 minutes long – (or so it seemed) – too long I thought. It was was frustrating, as we “watched our orange juice get warm”. After breakfast came chores – – dishes had to be done, and Grandpa always wanted more kindling (for fires in the fireplace). This was was our job, and we’d spend about an hour or so looking for dead twigs in the woods, which would find their way into a fire in the fireplace on a cold morning. Finally at about 11 a.m. (and no earlier for sure!) we finally were allowed to get in our bathing suits, hang out on the dock and swim. I love my memories of the black inner tubes we played on. We’d bunch them in half, shove them between our legs, jump in the lake, and ride on them like horses! Kezar Lake was where I learned to swim, and the “rite of passage” was swimming across the lake, with my father along side in the boat. At about noon my mom would leave the dock to make lunch, and the rest of us had to be ready (and dressed – no one came to the table in bathing suits) by about 1 p.m. for lunch. Yes – the bell was rung again when lunch was ready! Following lunch was “rest hour”, no matter what our age. We didn’t have to sleep, and could read or play solitaire, but we could not talk. After our rest we often had free time, and sometimes we got a chance for another swim. However, on many days groceries had to be purchased at the North Lovell store. Most times we drove there, but sometimes on really nice days we’d take the motor boat to the town landing, then walk to the store, pulling a little red wagon to carry the groceries back to the boat. That was always fun. Dinner was about 6 or 6:30 and that bell was rung for that, too. Following dinner – and after the dishes were washed – we’d spend our evenings playing cards or reading before going to the “other cabin” to bed.

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The Bell that told us when to do what!

There was only a few times when this schedule was changed. After breakfast on Sunday morning, we’d change into our good clothes for the worship service at the Center Lovell church at 11 a.m. That was the only day when I didn’t care if it rained. To sit inside the (usually hot) church building with the sun shining through the windows meant that we were losing precious time on the dock swimming. At least we got a brief chance for a swim after church and before a slightly later lunch.

About once (or twice) a summer we would also change our schedule if we took a day hike or climbed a mountain: Baldface, Chocorua, Speckled, Blueberry Mt. Then there were short climbs up Sabbatus Mountain where we’d take a picnic dinner, watch the sunset from the top, then climb down.

Rainy days were actually fun in camp. They were lazy as we’d read, play cards or board games (my favorite was “Clue”) to the sound of the rain on the roof. Sometimes we chose those days to go into Norway, Maine to do laundry and have lunch out. It was relaxing – and especially relaxing to go to sleep to the rain sounds at night. However, if it went on for more than two days, we’d all get antsy.

These childhood memories are what make the lure so strong to continue the traditions there each summer. Things are different now, as Grandpa is not around to invoke his regimen. For that I admit I’m glad. We linger over morning coffee on the dock now. No one is there to tell us we can’t eat a meal in our bathing suit! The bell doesn’t ring anymore, nor does anyone play Taps and Revile. Before dinner we have cocktails on the dock (or porch), something Grandpa wouldn’t have allowed. And – meals are when we want them – not at specific times. As I’d mentioned, The family has made improvements to the cabins in the form of flush toilets, running hot water, as well as replacement of those old army cots – to name just a few things. But – the basic mood and ambiance of camp and the surrounding area remains mostly unchanged. The North Lovell store has been closed for many years, forcing us to travel a little further for groceries, but the store building remains as a landmark. We eat out a lot more now, as a few more restaurants have opened up nearby.

Next post I’ll mention some of the specifics of this years time on Kezar.


The next few entries will be about our trip to Maine — to Kezar Lake, Maine to be precise — from July 18-28. As a child, *this* was our “vacation place”. Many memories and traditions were made here. And, like all strong childhood memories, they are lasting and special.   For me there was this mystique and “sacredness” created about our Kezar Lake vacations.  But – before I go into them, the trip up — “the journey” — is also part of the “destination”. It’s not simply a means to an end, but part of the entire experience, and deserves it’s own entry.

Our trip is unusual because we take a ferry to get there. Instead of driving the 100 miles of Long Island before heading north to New England, we take the Orient Point (Long Island) / New London (Connecticut) ferry. We made reservations on the 9 a.m. ferry, the “John H”, on July 18th for the hour and a half trip to New London. Orient Point is a little more than an hour away from home, so our 7 a.m. exit time gave  us ample time to be at the ferry slip 1/2 hour early as they suggest. The ferry ride is scenic with a variety of lighthouses, as well as interesting activities on the Thames River in Connecticut to photograph. It’s a relaxing ride – and it cuts down on the actual drive to Maine to only (about) 5 hours (from New London). The “John H” is the largest of the Cross Sound ferries, and is the most luxurious, in my opinion. We spend our time on the ferry having breakfast and photographing anything of interest….

The weather for our ride was clear, but the ozone was thick rendering it very hazy. I took some photographs which made it appear that it was foggy! Here’s a snapshot in photographs of our ferry ride….

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1. Orient Point Light
2. Block Island Light

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1. The Ledges Light – close to Connecticut
2. I do NOT know what this lighthouse is! Anyone who knows, please let me know!

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Both these photos are of the New London Lighthouse, located on the edge of the Thames river as you’re coming in from the Sound

We Passed by other ferries. this one is “The Mary Ellen”, which had just left New London, headed for Orient Point:

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And, then there were other boats…

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As we came into Thames River, we encountered a sailing regatta of some kind…

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Inside the ferry:

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1. I love this lighted sign – located in the bar area of “The John H” – the ferry on which we were traveling.
2. Passengers seated at tables…
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Welcome to New London – nearing the ferry slip

And … with that, about 10:20 a.m., we exited the ferry for the rest of our drive to Maine…


After the 4th of July, it was time to pack for a quick trip to Hilton Head to pick up Ray’s 2003 t-bird, which was still down there, and needed to come back to New York to be inspected. On July 6th we drove south together to accomplish this task. This would not be a long trip, and definitely was not considered a “vacation”. We planned only to spend two days there to rest up before returning north again, with Ray driving the t-bird and me driving our Ford Edge. Of course I took the time to take some photos while we were there…

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1. Front Yard – Hilton Head Island
2. Sego Palm branch
3. Sego Palm

We didn’t do all that much during the two days there in order to rest for our return trip. The weather was hot — triple digit hot — so we limited our outside activities unless absolutely necessary. However, I connected with my friend, Kim – and we took a sunset photo walk on a beach up in Sea Pines the night before we left. It was hot and humid – even at that hour of the day, but the breeze was stiff which tempered the heat.

However, I ran into an interesting problem when I tried to take photos. The temperature and humidity difference between the air conditioned house and car and the hot sticky beach was great and my camera’s lens totally fogged up – – so much so that when it was at it’s worst, there was no way the camera would auto focus on anything. When I looked through the camera, it was like looking through my own foggy eye glasses when there is a change in temperature from cold to warm, so I understood what was going on. It’s not as if this was the first time this has happened to me with a camera, either. However, it seemed to take an unusually long time for the lens to finally right itself. Kim wasn’t having issues, and was taking photos, which worried me some. I didn’t know if I should intervene and clean it – but my instinct told me not to mess with that inner lens – especially on a windy, sandy beach where sand particles could get inside. Thankfully, right before the sunset, it finally cleared out – – just in time!

Here are pictures as taken through the foggy lens once it would auto focus:

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1. The first picture my camera took with foggy lens of sea debris
2. Oddly beautiful — eerie – facing into the sun.

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1. Professional photographers often use the beach as a backdrop for formal family photos, and this family is organizing for their picture. I think the choice of turquoise is nice contrast to the color of the sand.
2. The water is “liquid gold”!

The Sunset
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Sunset – far away and close up

If you wish to see any of my photos larger, click on them to see them in Flickr.


Yet again I’ve allowed myself to get way behind on the posting of my photos, and will try to catch up now. I admit – I missed taking a photo during one of the days during this time. Much has happened since I last posted. I’ve returned from a wonderful visit to my friends Claire and Terry. While there, I attended the North Georgia Conference of the United Methodist Church on the day that the new retirees made 3 minute speeches capsulizing their ministries. Terry is now retired, and I was there and took photos while he spoke and Claire stood next to him. It was a moving experience to be a part of their transition to “retired status”.

We also had dinner in a Japanese steak house at their hibachi grill and on another day we went to “Mark of the Potter” gift shop to check out their hand crafted pottery. But, most of all, I just enjoyed being with Claire and Terry in their lovely new home which they purchased a few months ago for their retirement years. It’s beautiful and a house which just screams “I’m home” when you’re inside. It’s also not far from a National forest so birds and wildlife are never far. At dusk it’s not uncommon to see deer scampering through the yards in the neighborhood.

Now that I’m home, it’s back in mundane routine. There are days when I am at a loss as to what to photograph, as I fear I’m repeating myself. Same subject, just different day. Maybe I am, but often the second photograph reveals something new I didn’t see the first time, so there is nothing wrong with that, either. there also have been days I’ve not been in the mood to take photos, but that is also part of the process – to push myself even when I don’t want to bother. On one day my photo was taken close to midnight.

So … with that – I’ll pick up where I left off:

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365 photo #163 (June 11). This was one of the nights we went to the Japanese Restaurant “Kiku’s” – and I took pictures during the show. This is taken when the chef piles onion slices in the shape of a volcano, and then lights it to allow smoke and flames to come from inside so it truly appears like an erupting volcano. You can see our main course is also cooking at the same time!

365 photo #164 (June 12) – EPIC FAIL. No photo taken

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365 photo #165 (June 13) – This was the day we were at the North Georgia Conference of the United Methodist Church. This was a globe from a world missions booth. The dove is a symbol of peace, and the globe has Africa facing the outward. I took many photos of Claire and Terry but not sure they should be posted, as they were taken particularly for them.

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365 photo #166 (June 14) – this photo was taken at “Mark of the Potter”, which is located right along a flowing stream. In fact there is a balcony in the shop that looks over this stream. What a beautiful setting!

Bonus photos for this day:

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1. The rushing stream
2. I love this sign 🙂 It pretty much gets the message across from the trout’s point of view!

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Both photos were taken near Claire’s feeders outside her front door…
1. male goldfinch
2. female cardinal

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365 photo #167 (June 15). I left Claire and Terry’s on this day and this photo is taken at the Hampton Inn motel where I stayed that night. I was on the 4th floor – and it was an interesting view at sunset. Sometimes high tension wires can be photogenic!

Bonus photos from the motel:

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1. view as a whole from my room
2. purple clouds of sunset – also from the room.

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365 photo # 168 (June 16) – These are the coffee mugs I purchased from “Mark of the Potter”. I love the shape, and they are very comfortable to hold, not to mention that they hold a lot of coffee, which is a requirement for a coffee mug for me!

I just checked – and according to my camera, I technically took this photo at 12:03 a.m. on June 17, but I’m going to count it as June 16th!

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365 photo #169 (June 17). Periodically I must make sure the kitties are subjects for the photo of the day. This is Felix lying on one of his favorite beds, on the back of the couch where we’ve placed their fleece beds. 🙂

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365 photo #170 (June 18) Late afternoon sun looking out over our front yard. You can see the shadow of the top of the house on the lawn at the bottom of the photo, plus our arbor vitae, and the birch tree to the right in the photo.

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365 photo #171 (June 19) – male and female cardinal ground feeding under the feeders.

Two bonus photos of male cardinals near the bird feeders out back:

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365 photo #172 – (June 20). This is not that great a photo, as I had to take it out a rather dirty window. the deer is at the edge of our property all set to dart away through the bushes. If I’d tried to go out, I’m sure this very skittish deer would have been long gone and the photo would never have happened. I messed with contrast and saturation to make it a bit more clear, but it still feels a bit distorted. At dusk we have so many deer who frequent our yard. The hedge in front of our house has been pretty much decimated by the deer this year, and we have to do something about planting something else — making sure it’s something deer don’t like to eat!

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365 photo #173 (June 21) Our hydrangea is beginning to come out!! More photos will come later of these!

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365 photo #174 (June 22 – yesterday) I was not in the mood for photography yesterday and I don’t know why. So – later in the evening I took a photo of the soda I was drinking – black cherry Fresca. It’s my favorite flavor. Sadly it’s next to impossible to get in Hilton Head. I bring down a few 12 packs, and then drink it sparingly while we’re there.

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365 photo #175 (June 23 – today). This is a view of our side yard (I’m standing in the front yard) showing the brick walkway which goes up to the front of our house, and a section of our driveway. It was a gorgeous day today!

And – that completes the photos – – until tomorrow, of course. Until then….!

Calm Days


Life slowed down quite a bit after our trip to the Blue Ridge Parkway. I surely needed the slow down as so much of the previous days were spent traveling or in the car. My photos reflect the “calmness” of our days. It’s so nice to have relaxing “girlfriend” time…!

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365 photo #160 Friday, May 8 – a beautiful Bromeliad plant which Terry and Claire have potted on their front porch. What a gorgeous flower. I had trouble duplicating the color of the flower, as my photos came out too dark, but with messing with some camera settings, as well as a bit of post editing, I think it is close to what I know it to be. I have found that often the color red is more difficult to take accurate to the actual shade it is in the world.

A few quick bonus photos from that day…

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1. A female house finch – in staging area for the feeders at Claire’s house
2. a male cardinal – also in the staging area.

Claire and Terry are in the process of retiring from the Methodist ministry, and are moving from the parsonage of their last appointment into a house they purchased last December. One room, which will be their den is the staging area for packed boxes being brought over to their new house. The garage is another spot where they have boxes. There is unpacking yet to do….

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365 photo #161 – Chaos from the moving process 😦 Remind me never … EVER … to move!! ~

On Sunday (yesterday) I attended services at the churches (it’s a Methodist circuit of 2 churches) from where Terry will be retiring. When leaving the second service, I took the time to take photos of the most gorgeous Tiffany style stained glass windows, as well as some of the ceiling light fixtures.

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365 photo #162 – Sunday, June 10 – A portion of one of the stained glass windows

Bonus photos:

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1. Ceiling light fixture
2. The top of one of the stained glass windows

I have not yet taken today’s 365 photo….!


I arrived at Claire’s on Tuesday night. That evening I kept saying to myself I need a photo of the day, but I didn’t know what to photograph – and didn’t want to get up out of my chair to find something.

365 photo #158. No Photo. Epic Fail

The following day Claire, Terry and I went on a day trip to the Blue Ridge Parkway. They were celebrating their wedding anniversary on this trip – and I got to go along. Because the parkway is full of numerous photo ops, I made up for the lack of a photograph on the previous day. It was a wonderful trip with fairly good weather: partly cloudy which provided interesting cloud cover for photographs. It was crystal clear — no haze — with cool temperatures mostly in the 60’s, and occasionally in the 50’s in the higher elevations. We entered the parkway just north of Mount Mitchell and traveled south. We took a ride into Mount Mitchell and stopped off of various overlooks to take photos. In the spring there are lots of wildflowers in bloom: rhododendrons and flame azalea and other things of which I’m unfamiliar.

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365 photo #159 — This is a short path from the Glassmine Falls overlook which goes to a higher level for a better view of the vista. The path is picturesque – and I love the split rail fence.

This calls for bonus photos!

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1. The first thing once we got onto the Parkway was to stop at the Folk Art Center. It’s a wonderful craft shop filled with various artisans from the Blue Ridge Mountain area. I’ve purchased some barrettes for my hair there and wanted some more in different colors, but it was an unsuccessful mission. They did not have any selection.
2. rhododendrons!

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1. Flame Azalea – gorgeous orange flowering bush!
2. On one of the overlooks (I can’t remember which one now) there is this nearly dead tree. It’s so gnarled and growing in odd directions, probably due to the elements. I also think it’s been hit by lightning several times. The tree reminds me a little of driftwood in a way!

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1. Rhododendron as seen at an overlook – with mountains in the background
2. Another vista – at Glassmine Falls overlook. The shade from the clouds gave the mountains a tapestry look.

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1. Glassmine falls
2. an unknown wildflower. Sometimes something so small is so pretty!

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1. Ohio Buckeye bud. The hummingbirds were swarming around these – and I tried to get a photo, but they are very quick and very small!
2. At the glassmine falls overlook there’s this interesting tree that splits not far from the tree trunk’s base. There are leaves growing around the area.

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1. Dinner at Pisgah Inn. The view from the dining room was superb!
2. Sunset photo – as we were leaving dinner. From there, as it got dark, we drove the approximately 50 miles to the southern most end of the Parkway, where we got off to make our way home.

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My friends, Claire and Terry — Happy Anniversary to you!!

More catch up photos will be posted in my next entry….


Today was not much of a photo day, as I was behind the wheel for most of the day – headed to North Georgia to visit my friend, Claire. But – I have taken my daily photo now that I’m settled in for the night in a motel en route. I’m not sure how many miles I drove, but I have about 350 miles to go tomorrow and that is a LOT less than what I drove today! My 365 photo is showing what I’m doing before hitting the sack … which will be soon! It was a tiring day…. More driving tomorrow, but at least not as much. 🙂

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365 photo #157 – Using the wifi connection at the Hampton Inn! Notice that I always use a portable keyboard and mouse and mouse pad to protect the laptop’s keyboard and touch pad, as I’ve found that they WILL and DO have to be replaced. I guess I’m hard on them….! I also enjoyed my SUBWAY sandwich for dinner, and I’m finishing up the soda now!

The Savannah trip to see the Tall Ships was Ray’s and my last special event in Hilton before our trip north. The last two days were spent mostly packing and organizing, and photography had to take a back seat. But – I did manage to take photos on those days.

Sunday, May 6th was a Sunday, and after church – and before settling down to serious packing – I noticed a few more magnolia blooms were out. The tree is rarely covered because the squirrels get the blooms, smash them to the ground and I suppose find the seeds within. But – this one was still securely on the tree and just about ready to open:

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365 photo #127

By the following day – Monday, May 7th – both Ray and I were mostly packed and our stuff was “staged” in the living room in readiness to load the cars. The idea was to get most of this done the day before we left, so we could leave pronto on Tuesday morning, May 8th. When I took this photo, a certain percentage of the luggage had already been packed in the cars, so you get an idea of the magnitude of what we transport each time we move from one abode to the other. I often wonder how we could cut back on the amount, but it doesn’t ever seem to happen….

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365 photo #128

No bonus photos 😦

Next Stop — Eastern Long Island!


Ray and I usually go to Savannah on the first Saturday of each month that we’re in Hilton Head, as they always have a special craft fair, as well as entertainment on the river front. At dusk at the conclusion of December’s “First Saturday” celebration, Savannah has it’s annual Santa Claus parade, so there’s lots going on. The First Saturday in May was also special, as it included about 14 Tall Ships docked along the riverfront. They are part of the commemoration of the War of 1812 and are headed up the eastern seaboard – beginning in Savannah GA, then to Greenport, Long Island, NY, Newport, RI, and ending in Halifax, Nova Scotia. They will take part in these town’s festivities. Check out this website for more information.

I had never seen the Tall Ships up close, and they are magnificent. When they say they are tall — believe it! One had to purchase tickets to get into the roped off area of the dock where the ships were docked, and to tour the ships. You could see them from behind the ropes, of course, but it was more fun to get up close. The only down side of the day was that it was hot with bright sun and temperatures in the mid 90’s. Despite the fact that the ship tours were interesting, I began to wilt after two of them. But – other than the heat, it was a great day, with blue skies and puffy white clouds, which made a great backdrop for photographing the ships and their tall masts.

So — May 6th photo of the day will be from our day with the Tall Ships:

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365 photo #126 — tall mast taken while touring “The Eagle”

And – this day deserves some bonus photos!

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1. First view of a ship as we were climbing down the stairs to River Street
2. The ships lined up on the dock

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1. spartan bunk – – and I think this might be an officers bunk – so I think the others were even more spartan!
2. I cannot remember the name of this particular boat, but this lady is at on the front of the boat – leading the way!

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1. Ships lined up – as taken from on board “The Eagle”….
2. tourists take rides so they can see the Tall Ships from on the river. I wish we had done this…

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1 and 2 — on board “The Eagle”

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1. A container ship as seen through one of the Tall Ships, “The Eagle”.
2. A tall ship – with the Savannah Bridge (to South Carolina) in the background

And … two non tall ship photos of River Street….

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1. One stairway out of River Street. The steps are made of stone and very steep – tough on the knees!
2. Old River Street buildings

Next stop for the Tall Ships will be over Memorial Day Weekend, and will be held close to us on the North Shore of Long Island — Greenport. It will be a smaller and “lower key” festival than Savannah, as they will only have 7 confirmed ships. I’d like to go, however, I’m not sure we will. Knowing Greenport as I do, parking will be a nightmare.

More updates coming later. Still not caught up!

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